25 Best Transition Words for Providing Evidence

Transition Words for Providing Evidence

Transition words and phrases for providing evidence include “For example,”, “Evidence shows”, “A study found”, and “To demonstrate this point”.

These transition words and phrases can smooth the transition from one sentence to the next and help guide your reader, as shown below:

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. In fact, a 2021 literature review found that 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

If you have an entire paragraph dedicated to outlining evidence for your argument, you may want a transition word at the start of the paragraph that indicates to your reader that you are about to provide evidence for statements made in a previous paragraph.

Shortlist of Transition Words for Evidence

  • To illustrate this point…
  • As can be seen in…
  • To demonstrate,…
  • Evidence of this fact can be seen in…
  • Proof of this point is found in…
  • For instance,…
  • For one thing,…
  • Compelling evidence shows…
  • For a case in point, readers should look no further than…
  • In fact, one study finds…
  • New evidence has found…
  • Evidence shows…
  • In view of recent evidence,…
  • Notably, one study found…
  • A seminal study has found…
  • According to…
  • In the article…
  • Three separate studies have found…
  • Research indicates…
  • Supporting evidence shows…
  • As [Author] demonstrates…
  • For example,…
  • A study in 2022 found…
  • This argument is supported by…
  • A key report on this topic uncovered…

Examples of Transitions to Evidence (in Context)

1. For example…

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. For example, a 2021 literature review found that 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

2. As [Author] demonstrates…

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. As Lynas et al. (2021) demonstrate, 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

3. Evidence suggests…

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. Evidence from a 2021 literature review suggests that 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

4. A study in 2021 found…

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. A study in 2021 found that 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

5. This argument is supported by…

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. This argument is supported by a comprehensive literature review in 2021 that found that 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021).”

Transition Words for Explaining Evidence

After you have provided your evidence, it is recommended that you provide a follow-up sentence explaining the evidence, its strength, and its relevance to the reader.

In other words, you may need a subsequent transition word that moves your reader from evidence to explanation.

Some examples of transition words for explaining evidence include:

  • “This evidence shows…”
  • “As shown above,”
  • “The relevance of this point is”
  • “These findings demonstrate”
  • “This evidence compellingly demonstrates”
  • “These findings suggest”
  • “With this information, it is reasonable to conclude”

Examples of Transition Words for Explaining Evidence (in Context)

1. “This evidence shows…”

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. As Lynas et al. (2021) demonstrate, 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021). This evidence shows that governments should take climate change very seriously.”

2. “As shown above,”

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. As Lynas et al. (2021) demonstrate, 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021). As shown above, the evidence is compelling. Governments should take climate change very seriously.”

3. “The relevance of this point is”

The scientific community is nearly unanimous about the human-caused impacts of climate change. As Lynas et al. (2021) demonstrate, 99% of published scientific papers on climate change agree that humans have caused climate change (Lynas et al, 2021). The relevance of this point is that the time for debate is over. Governments should take climate change very seriously.”

Writing your Paragraph

I have a very simple structure for paragraphs. It’s as follows:

  • Aim for 4 to 6 sentences per paragraph
  • Use a topic sentence for the first sentence
  • Follow up with transition phrases that help link the topic sentence to evidence and explanations that support your topic sentence.

Sometimes people call this the TEEL paragraph: topic, evidence, explanation, linking sentence.

It looks something like this:

basic essay paragraph structure template

For more on how I teach paragraphs, watch my YouTube video below:

(You can also take my essay writing course for all my tips and tricks on essay writing!)

Other Types of Transition Words

1. Emphasis

  • “This strongly suggests”
  • “To highlight the seriousness of this,”
  • “To emphasize this point,”

2. Addition

  • “In addition,”
  • “Furthermore,”
  • “Moreover,”
  • “Additionally,”

3. Compare and Contrast

  • “By contrast,”
  • “However, other evidence contradicts this.”
  • “Despite this,”

4. Order

  • “Firstly”, “secondly”, “thirdly”
  • “Following on from the above point,”
  • “Next”, “Then”, “Finally”

5. Cause and Effect

  • “As a result,”
  • “This has caused…”
  • “Consequently,”
  • “Because of this,”
  • “Thus,”

6. Result

  • “As a result,”
  • “Due to this,”
  • “The result of this”

7. Illustration

  • “For example,”
  • “To illustrate this point,”
  • “An illustrative example is…”

8. Summary and Conclusion

  • “In conclusion”
  • “This essay has demonstrated”
  • “Given the compelling evidence presented in this essay,”

How many are Too many Transition Words?

I generally recommend between 1 and 3 transition words per paragraph, with an average of about 2.

If you have a transition word at the start of each and every sentence, the technique becomes repetitive and loses its value.

While you should use a transition whenever you feel it is necessary and natural, it’s worth checking if you’ve over-used certain words and phrases throughout your essay.

I’ve found the best way to see if your writing has started to sound unnatural is to read it out loud to yourself.

In this process, consider:

  • Removing some Transition Words: If you identify a paragraph that has a transition word at the beginning of every single sentence, remove a few so you have one at the start of the paragraph and one in the middle of the paragraph – that’s all.
  • Removing Overused Words: People tend to get a single word stuck in their head and they use it over and over again. If you identify overuse of a single word, it’s best to change it up. Consider some synonyms (like some of the words and phrases listed above) to add some more variety to your language.

Conclusion

Overall, transition words that show evidence can help guide your reader. They allow you to tell a smooth and logical story. They can enhance the quality of your writing and help demonstrate your command of the topic.

When transitioning from an orientation sentence to your evidence, use transition words like “For example,” and “Evidence demonstrates” to link the two sentences or paragraphs.

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